ragons replied to your post: I wanted to use up those dyed pheasant…

omg allergic to birds D: so sorry. its nuts you wouldn’t notice with the chickens tho. i spend some time outside with mine. idk, hope you find a solution though!

It really surprised me since I pick the chickens up all the time with no ill effects, but as soon as I was in an enclosed room with these little birds I could feel my sinuses closing up within minutes.

Luckily I live in Florida, so from what I’ve read it should be possible to build an outdoor aviary for them with few issues except for two months in the dead of winter.

I wanted to use up those dyed pheasant feathers I’d accidentally bought, so here’s a quick little generic Microraptor hopping off a rock.

I also wanted to try sticking something on eBay to see what happens, but was wary of putting up anything too involved since it’ll probably end up selling for much less than I’d normally charge. ^^;

x-file:

catazoid:

As promised, here are some pictures of Lyalya’s first walk outside! Look at the bushy little squirrel tail :D the sandpit was her favorite spot! She was extremely excited and threw sand all over the place

this is a fucking squirrel. this is a fucking squirrel with a cat’s head. who is responsible for this

(via murdor)

18004206969:

Yes. I’d like some bird seeds, thank you. and how long does it usually take for the birds to grow.

(via beeftony)

Partial albinism in mammals

Sometimes partial albinism or amelanism is thought to be restricted to non-mammalian species since reptiles and birds can lack all three melanin pigments but still be brightly colored due to carotenoid pigments.

Hopefully these pictures are sufficient to disprove that notion and show that mammals can end up lacking just one or two of the melanin pigments rather than always all three as in true albinism and leucism. Also, random acromelanistic dog because I am just a sucker for the Siamese coloration. <3

Honestly, how bizarre is that? Normal pigment, just concentrated on cooler body parts? Are you all aware of how weird that is? They’re born white, by the way, and get darker as they age. Their winter coat is significantly darker than the summer coat too. /tangent

It’s also worth noting that partial albinism/pigment reduction can effect eye colors in some really weird ways aside from blue or red. With the reduced or missing black pigment red dobermans end up with yellow eyes instead of brown.

You can sometimes see greenish eyes on pitbulls with light-colored noses too, since green is a result of reduced pigment and the way eyes diffract light, not magical green mammal pigment.

Also, if, say, a cat has a form of albinism where it only produces yellow pigment, and its’ eyes were supposed to be yellow anyway, then that cat is still going to have yellow(or green) eyes despite technically being partially albino.

meganiswright:

difficultyin-dealingwithme:

the-uncensored-she:

harboua:

This country is such a fucking joke. Did you know that if we were to divide the income in this country fairly it would be about 300,000 per person. That’s annually. You could give each person in this country 100,000 and still have enough to invest in infrastructure and research. Instead we have people who don’t have water, don’t have their basic human rights fulfilled, because they don’t have enough to pay a bill. 

Capitalism is inhumane.

Okay yes, but communism has been shown to only work theoretically. Dividing up finances among the people evenly would cause a whole shit storm of economic crap that would probably fuck us over until the end of time. Granted, I believe capitalism in it’s current form causes unprecedented suffering that could be fixed. Unfortunately, the way our capitalist society has grown has created a gap of greed, disallowing us from fixing anything. Basically we fucked either way.

It doesn’t work because if you give me $100,000 annually no matter what job i do or how well i do it that means there is no reason for me to do better for something like a promotion if there isn’t anything to motivate me. Why would i be a lawyer when i could just not work or do something worthless and get paid the same? Why learn to fish if you know you will be handed fish every day for the rest of your life? While there are issues like people who dont have water or food, communism would not be a good option to fix them. Somebody will always have less than somebody else and that is life. Instead of complaining about it go volunteer handing out food to the homeless, it will do much more good. 

Most people have ambition though.

When I was homeless pretty much everything I did had to go towards survival. Very little of value was created, my art stagnated, my whole life was about making money and not spending excess money.

Aside from making me a stronger person and getting a good dog the whole experience was fundamentally worthless and costly for society. All that struggle was an exercise in futility, all that working and saving and scrounging was not enough to drag me out of poverty. Luck trumps five years of hard work, and that luck only came about because through a bunch of random coincidences beyond my control I just happened to have enough spare cash to make something cool and pointless, and someone else found and wanted that pointless pretty thing.

There are millions of amazing people out there who are living mediocre, unsatisfying lives because they have to choose between feeding themselves or chasing their passions. That person working two part time jobs and collecting food stamps just to survive could be unraveling the mysteries of plant communication or writing a story that will touch thousands of lives or turning complex concepts into cute, informative YouTube videos and just generally improving the world.

Then there are all the people who will always want to buy more things, commission custom art or get a mansion or hoard all the Magic cards. It’s not like service jobs would ever truly be lost, they’d just need to be better compensated.

People deserve to live, not just survive.

mytheetarecold:

avianeurope:

Pin-tailed Sandgrouse (Pterocles alchata) »by Patrik Wittenby (1|2)

Well here’s an unbelievably magnificent bird with a back like the light filtering through trees to a leafy forest ground or a sunrise gleaming off a gently flowing stream. BIRD. WAI U SO DIVINE

antediluvianechoes:

Velociraptor and Juvenile Tarbosaurus by Guindagear
It’s hard to put a Protoceratops in a tree. It had taken Velociraptor nearly a half an hour to do so, tugging, pulling, hefting the heavy thing. The carcass was floppy and didn’t cooperate; the head shield got caught on a protrusion of bark; the limbs bumped and bounced against the tree like unsynced pendulums.
As soon as the dromaeosaur’s larder was filled—the dead Protoceratops balanced just right—the tarbosaurs came snooping. Dragging a dead dinosaur into a tree is not inconspicuous business, and the juveniles had heard and smelled enough to pique their curiosity and come trotting.
Velociraptor stared down at the two tyrannosaurs. It was safe—tarbosaurs couldn’t climb trees—but it was also stuck—tarbosaurs were excruciatingly patient (through juveniles admittedly less so than adults). They knew one bad tug from a misplaced bite might send the Protoceratops falling from the pantry. Or, if luck was particularly one-sided, the carcass and the Velociraptor could spill from the branch.
And so the three predators stared, occasionally pipping and fluting songs of aggression or ownership at each other, neither side backing away from the meal perched unsecurely in the tree.

antediluvianechoes:

Velociraptor and Juvenile Tarbosaurus by Guindagear

It’s hard to put a Protoceratops in a tree. It had taken Velociraptor nearly a half an hour to do so, tugging, pulling, hefting the heavy thing. The carcass was floppy and didn’t cooperate; the head shield got caught on a protrusion of bark; the limbs bumped and bounced against the tree like unsynced pendulums.

As soon as the dromaeosaur’s larder was filled—the dead Protoceratops balanced just right—the tarbosaurs came snooping. Dragging a dead dinosaur into a tree is not inconspicuous business, and the juveniles had heard and smelled enough to pique their curiosity and come trotting.

Velociraptor stared down at the two tyrannosaurs. It was safe—tarbosaurs couldn’t climb trees—but it was also stuck—tarbosaurs were excruciatingly patient (through juveniles admittedly less so than adults). They knew one bad tug from a misplaced bite might send the Protoceratops falling from the pantry. Or, if luck was particularly one-sided, the carcass and the Velociraptor could spill from the branch.

And so the three predators stared, occasionally pipping and fluting songs of aggression or ownership at each other, neither side backing away from the meal perched unsecurely in the tree.

(via tyrannosaurslair)

palaeopedia:

The great Auk, Pinguinus impennis (1758)
Phylum&#160;: ChordataClass&#160;: AvesOrder&#160;: CharadriiformesFamily&#160;: AlcidaeGenus&#160;: PinguinusSpecies&#160;: P. impennis
Extinct in 1852
80 cm tall and 5 kg (size)
Northern Atlantic Ocean (map)
The Great Auk was never observed and described by modern scientists during its existence, and is only known from the accounts of laymen, such as sailors, so its behaviour is therefore not well known and hard to reconstruct. However, much can also be inferred from its close, living relative, the Razorbill, as well as from remaining soft tissue.
Great Auks walked slowly and sometimes used their wings to help them traverse rough terrain. When they did run, it was awkwardly and with short steps in a straight line. They had few natural predators, mainly large marine mammals, such as the Orca, and White-tailed Eagles. Polar bears preyed on nesting colonies of the auk. This species had no innate fear of human beings, and their flightlessness and awkwardness on land compounded their vulnerability. They were hunted for food, feathers, and as specimens for museums and private collections. Great Auks reacted to noises, but were rarely scared by the sight of something. The auks used their bills aggressively both in the dense nesting sites and when threatened or captured by humans. These birds are believed to have had a life span of about 20 to 25 years. During the winter, the Great Auk migrated south either in pairs or in small groups, and never with the entire nesting colony.
The Great Auk was generally an excellent swimmer, using its wings to propel itself underwater. While swimming, the head was held up but the neck was drawn in. This species was capable of banking, veering, and turning underwater. The Great Auk was known to dive to depths of 76 metres and it has been claimed that the species was able to dive to depths of 1 kilometre. It could also hold its breath for 15 minutes, longer than a seal. The Great Auk was capable of accelerating under water, then shooting out of the water to land on a rocky ledge above the ocean’s surface.

palaeopedia:

The great Auk, Pinguinus impennis (1758)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Aves
Order : Charadriiformes
Family : Alcidae
Genus : Pinguinus
Species : P. impennis

  • Extinct in 1852
  • 80 cm tall and 5 kg (size)
  • Northern Atlantic Ocean (map)

The Great Auk was never observed and described by modern scientists during its existence, and is only known from the accounts of laymen, such as sailors, so its behaviour is therefore not well known and hard to reconstruct. However, much can also be inferred from its close, living relative, the Razorbill, as well as from remaining soft tissue.

Great Auks walked slowly and sometimes used their wings to help them traverse rough terrain. When they did run, it was awkwardly and with short steps in a straight line. They had few natural predators, mainly large marine mammals, such as the Orca, and White-tailed Eagles. Polar bears preyed on nesting colonies of the auk. This species had no innate fear of human beings, and their flightlessness and awkwardness on land compounded their vulnerability. They were hunted for food, feathers, and as specimens for museums and private collections. Great Auks reacted to noises, but were rarely scared by the sight of something. The auks used their bills aggressively both in the dense nesting sites and when threatened or captured by humans. These birds are believed to have had a life span of about 20 to 25 years. During the winter, the Great Auk migrated south either in pairs or in small groups, and never with the entire nesting colony.

The Great Auk was generally an excellent swimmer, using its wings to propel itself underwater. While swimming, the head was held up but the neck was drawn in. This species was capable of banking, veering, and turning underwater. The Great Auk was known to dive to depths of 76 metres and it has been claimed that the species was able to dive to depths of 1 kilometre. It could also hold its breath for 15 minutes, longer than a seal. The Great Auk was capable of accelerating under water, then shooting out of the water to land on a rocky ledge above the ocean’s surface.

(via tyrannosaurslair)